“TSAR BOMB”

Tsar Bomba (Russian: Царь-бомба), literally “Tsar-Bomb“, is the nickname for the AN602 hydrogen bomb — the largest, most powerful nuclear weapon ever detonated, and currently the most powerful explosive device ever created.

 
Developed by the Soviet Union, the bomb was originally designed to have a yield of about 100 megatons of TNT (420 PJ); however, the bomb yield was reduced to only 50 Megatons — one quarter of the estimated yield of the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa — in order to reduce nuclear fallout. Only one bomb of this type was ever built and it was tested on October 30, 1961, in the Novaya Zemlya archipelago.
 
The remaining bomb casings are located at the Russian Atomic Weapon Museum, Sarov (Arzamas-16), and the Museum of Nuclear Weapons, All-Russian Research Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Chelyabinsk-70). Neither of these casings has the same antennae configuration as the actual device that was tested.

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